MinistryCraft Blog

The Fusion of Technology & Ministry

Is Your Church Vintage?

Is Your Church Vintage?
Change is inevitable, and technology is continuously changing. Regardless if you are a digital dinosaur still using a flip phone, or early adopter with the latest apps on your iPhone 11, change is coming. A few years ago, I walked out of the Apple store a little embarrassed. My iPod Nano was beyond repair because it was deemed "vintage and "nearly obsolete" by an Apple Tech as my iPod Nano was over six years old. When recently sharing this story with a friend, my thoughts turned to the local American church. I began to wonder If the local church's intentional or unintentional resistance to change labeled them as "vintage and nearly obsolete."
 
Read more

What Are Website Visitors Looking For?

What Are Website Visitors Looking For?
Visitors know little or anything at all about your church. Many of the 17 million non-churchgoers who visit your website silently check you out online want to know all there is to know about your church. When considering visitors visit your church website you want to provide content that makes it easy for them to know you. Consider the information they are seeking and answer their most pressing questions. Below are six things every visitor to your church website wants to know.
 
Read more

Are You Looking at The Right Numbers?

Are You Looking at The Right Numbers?
According to the latest research, 17 million non-regular churchgoers visited church websites in the last 12 months, and 85% of all visitors to your church will visit your church's website before attending in person. Sadly, though many churches leaders accept mediocrity and believe having an "okay" website is enough. Sadly, 94% of people mistrust a website with poor design and 88% of all website visitors never return to the same website again if they have had a bad experience the first time.
 
Do not be like them; behind the testimony of your people, the website could arguably be the most important communication tool of your church. Do not dismiss your opportunity to be salt and light to a digital world. All of this sounds good, but you may be thinking to yourself, "I don’t have the time" which is likely a very true statement.
 
At MinistryCraft, we have the time and expertise; for the last 20 years, we have been serving churches in the area of website design, website management, and IT solutions. We love being part of something that changes lives and has Kingdom impact. We consider our work as worship to our Creator and a ministry to church leaders. It is our honor to help you further the cause of Christ by connecting more people to your church via your website, while freeing church leaders to focus more on ministry. Accepting mediocrity is not an option. Contact us today and let us put technology to work for you.
 
 

The 7 Secrets to an Effective “I’m New Here” Section

The 7 Secrets to an Effective “I’m New Here” Section
A critical piece to the best church websites and church website design is a entire section that welcomes people who are shopping church websites before they show up on your doorstep. The best church website builders already know providing a path for visitors to plan their visit is essential for connecting more people to their physical church. They want basic questions about your church answered before ever attending your church in person. In fact, the latest church website trends reveal that some churches have a landing page completely dedicated to just visitors. When exploring church website design, you will notice the churches that try to answer as many questions as they can about the experience they offer. You can create an informative and easy to navigate visitors’ page. There are secrets that will help you make your visitors' section outstanding. This will save you the hassle of a flock of visitors on your welcome desk wanting to know more about your church. We wanted to provide the 7 Secrets to an effective “I’m New Here” Section ideas for your church website.
 
Read more

First Impressions Matter

First Impressions Matter

On average website visitors will spend between 7 seconds to 15 seconds before deciding to dig deeper or leave your page. For individuals seeking a church these times may fluctuate slightly; yet, capturing the attention of someone exploring your church online is critically important. “Reducing your website’s friction can lead to more quality interactions without complications.” says Paul Andrew in his article How to Reduce Friction in Web Design. Paul defines friction as “...anything that prevents your users from accomplishing their goals.”  As a church leader you want visitors to engage in the story and message of your church. This is accomplished by designing elements that create interest and providing intuitive ways for visitors to explore your website. According to the State of the Online Church an ebook created in 2018 by Vanderbloemen and Jay Kranda states that “59% of the churches (of the 176 surveyed) have seen physical growth since launching their online ministry”. Therefore, future-minded church leaders must be willing to consistently examine their own website and consider ways to reduce friction and make a great first impression, that transition online visitors into in-person attendance. For the purposes of this article we will identify five common areas that cause the most friction.

Read more

Is Your Website a Ghost Town?

Is Your Website a Ghost Town?
  • HBO’s smash hit show Chernobyl received 19 Emmy Awards, and due to the hit show  NBC News reports tourism has dramatically increased in the once Soviet small ghost town of Pripyat. The remains of the homes and businesses of the over 50,000 individuals serves as an eerily reminder of the nuclear meltdown that drove nearly all the residents away in less than 36 hours. National Geographic report “Ruin gazing” is nothing new—for millennia, people have been drawn to broken cities and toppled monuments, places of quiet contemplation that remind us of our own hubris and of the power of time.”, but what causes a ghost town and what are the potential similarities between it and your church website? 
Read more